Communicating Climate Risk

Save the date: 1 October, 12:30-17:00

Register here.

Communicating Climate Risk workshop

If the goal of climate communication is to compel decision-makers to act, then for too long our methods haven’t worked. Many desperately want to tackle the risks posed by climate change, but are confounded by mountains of complex, technical data. 

So how can academics present climate risk in ways that are meaningful and effective for this audience?  How can they ensure communication is part of their thinking from the outset, not just at the end of a research project? Who exactly are the end-users of climate risk research, and what are their needs? 

This online afternoon workshop will be jointly delivered by UCL’s Climate Action Unit and the Analysis under Uncertainty for Decision-Makers network (AU4DM). We will draw on interdisciplinary expertise to equip participants with the critical skills to communicate on climate risk. 

Speakers will share insights across three broad topics: why risk communication is difficult, what decision-makers want (and need), and how to present climate risk information. A final, fourth session will invite participants to co-design communication tools for the future. 

We need the big stories, the stories that engage and inspire. 

At the same time, we also need tools to present more niche information. 

And throughout, we also need to be always conscious of the politics of climate chance communication: the ways our communications shape whose voices are heard, and whose decisions count.

Speakers and facilitators:

  • Martine Barons (Warwick)
  • Mark Workman (Imperial)
  • Polina Levontin (Imperial)
  • Jo Lindsay Walton (Sussex)
  • Freya Roberts (UCL)
  • Kris de Meyer (UCL)
  • Lucy Hubble Rose (UCL)

This is an open workshop that will be especially relevant to climate and environmental scientists, and others whose work involves communicating or relying on scientific knowledge about climate and the environment. It is part of the COP26 Universities Network’s climate risk conference.

Climate Crisis and the Digital Humanities

To coincide with COP26 in Glasgow this year, SHL is jointly running two special events with the Edinburgh Centre for Data, Culture & Society, the University of Southampton DH, and the Humanities & Data Science Turing interest group. This is just a “save the dates” announcement: more info and registration will be coming soon.

November 3rd, Digital Materialities, Digital Imaginaries

16:00-17:30 GMT Online

More information and registration here. Our speakers will explore the materiality of the digital, and ask what can be done at all levels to make our digital world more sustainable.

Speakers:

  • Heba Amin
  • Nathan Ensmenger
  • Wilko Hardenberg
  • Helen Pritchard

What emerging digital technologies may also play a role in mitigating and adapting to climate change, and where do the perils and pitfalls lie? How might digital technologies even change the way we think about ‘the human’ and our place within the planetary ecology? And what are the biggest questions we should be asking ourselves about digital technologies today?

This event forms part of the Sussex Humanities Lab’s Open Workshop Series and CDCS’s Autumn Seminar Series. It is open to all.


Greening the Digital Humanities

November 10th, 16:00 – 17:30 GMT  Online

While the first joint event (Nov 3rd) focuses on theories, perspectives, principles, and inspirations, the second event shifts to thinking about practice, collaboration, and community-building. In it we will discuss the issues we have encountered, the problems our community can solve, and assemble actions we will take together.

The core participants will be DH researchers, along with other key stakeholders. Together we will explore: How do we, as individuals and as organisations, address the environmental dimension of the digital technologies we use? Where should we turn to for best practice? Where is research and innovation most urgently needed, and who should be doing it? What are the politics and ethics of greening the digital, and where do the biggest controversies lie? What challenges, risks and trade-offs might we face?  As Margaret Atwood has suggested, “climate change” might be better termed “everything change.” How might the transition to a zero carbon economy transform what we do, and how we define our own expertise and responsibilities? In a world where so much is digitally entwined, and ecologically interconnected, how can knowledge and responsibility be justly distributed?

The 10th November workshop is invite only. If you are interested in participating, please contact j.c.walton@sussex.ac.uk and briefly outline your interest.